Now Available: The Alois Kronschlaeger Monograph

This winter I’m pleased to announce the publication of my much-anticipated monograph, which encompasses everything from my early works to my site-specific installations and exhibitions with Cristin Tierney Gallery. This monograph really shows the breadth and progression of my work, spanning not only several years but also a great variety of scale in my practice, from individual cubes to monumental mountain ranges. In addition, it documents many of the people and institutions I’ve been fortunate enough to work with, such as Florencia Minniti, the Bruce Museum, SiTE:LAB, MOCA Tucson, Florian Altenburg, Paul Amenta, Mathias Kessler and many more. Essays by Joe Fig, Matthias Neumann, Muriel Pérez and Anne-Marie Russell comprise additional features of the monograph, which would not have been possible without the hard work of editor Julie Krienik and designer Brian Sisco, not to mention the generous support of Cristin Tierney. The monograph debuted with much success at UNTITLED Miami in December, and I am excited to be bringing copies with me to Mexico for ZONA MACO next month. Copies are also available through Cristin Tierney Gallery.

Grid Structure #1, 2014 basswood, paint, ink, aluminum mesh 216 x 72 x 72 in. (549 x 182 x 182 cm) site-specific installation, Bruce Museum, Greenwich, Connecticut May–August 2014 Photo Marc Lins
Grid Structure #1, 2014
basswood, paint, ink, aluminum mesh
216 x 72 x 72 in. (549 x 182 x 182 cm)
site-specific installation, Bruce Museum, Greenwich, Connecticut
May–August 2014
Photo Marc Lins
basin-range-04
Untitled (Basin and Range), 2013
wood, aluminum mesh, paint
dimensions variable
site-specific installation, Museum of Contemporary Art, Tucson, Arizona
October 2013 – March 2014
Photo Marc Lins
T B 7 (view 1), 2014 basswood, ink 24 x 24 x 24 in. (60.96 x 60.96 x 60.96 cm) Collection of the Artist Photo Paul Mutino
T B 7, 2014
basswood, ink
24 x 24 x 24 in. (60.96 x 60.96 x 60.96 cm)
Collection of the Artist
Photo Paul Mutino
Now Available: The Alois Kronschlaeger Monograph

30º at Night

As I mentioned in my previous post, the ability to leave 30º standing after the Untitled tent was broken down created an unanticipated shift in the way that I viewed the work. Its original intention was to be a site-specific installation within the confines of an art fair, with each gallery occupying a certain amount of designated space. I wanted to explore what would happen if I could impose this site-specific piece, breaking planes and axes, in a not-so-traditional art fair setting. I was extremely pleased with how the work turned out in that context, but having the chance to see the work in direct sunlight and moonlight gave me new insight into the work I created. It somehow altered the scale and empirical value of the work. I also believe it is a testament to the mission of SiTE:LAB and I am grateful to have had this opportunity.

Alois Kronschlaeger 30 Degrees

Alois Kronschlaeger 30 Degrees

Alois Kronschlaeger 30 Degrees

30º at Night

30º Exposed

Thanks to Untitled, we were able to leave 30º standing after the tent was being broken down. Although I didn’t imagine it from the outset, this was an important aspect for me in the range and depth of this project. It’s almost as if there were two projects encompassing 30º – the first being the installation within the context of the art fair, and the second being within the context of the skeleton of the tent. One can see from the following images that this change in environment radically changed the feeling of the piece. It was an important discovery for me in my work and something that I am always questioning and challenging with my site-specific installations.

Alois Kronschlaeger 30 Degrees

Alois Kronschlaeager 30 Degrees

Alois Kronschlaeager 30 Degrees

Alois Kronschlaeager 30 Degrees

Alois Kronschlaeager 30 Degrees

30º Exposed

Opening night of UNTITLED

I need to give thanks to the entire team for the opportunity to create 30º.  Many thanks to SiTE:LAB’s Paul Amenta, Tom Clinton and Bob Rogers, Kendall College of Art and Design students, Lydia Boda, Erin Dumond, Jacob Hanson, Jacob Kapusta and Nathan McCallum, plus Cristin Tierney and Denis Gardarin, and Untitled’s Omar Lopez-Chahoud.

Alois Kronschlaeger 30 Degrees

Alois Kronschlaeger 30 Degrees

Alois Kronschlaeger Cristin Tierney

Opening night of UNTITLED

Constructing 30º

There were many facets to constructing 30º at SiTE:LAB’s booth at Untitled in Miami Beach. First, we began with cutting a hole in the floor (not quite as hazardous as cutting a hole in the roof) to expose the tent structure and sand below. We laid the first grid out and then inserted the wooden anchors that would serve as the framework for 30º into the sand. From there, and with the help of Paul Amenta, Bob Rogers, and the students, Lydia Boda, Erin Dumond, Jacob Hanson, Jacob Kapusta and Nathan McCallum, we continued to erect the grid on the angle until it reached 25 feet in height.

Alois Kronschlaeger 30 Degrees

Alois Kronschlaeger 30 Degrees

Alois Kronschlaeger 30 Degrees

Alois Kronschlaeger 30 Degrees

Alois Kronschlaeger 30 Degrees

Alois Kronschlaeger 30 Degrees

Constructing 30º

30º at UNTITLED

Featured in SiTE:LAB’s booth at the Untitled Art Fair in Miami Beach, 30º emerged from the sand, extended through the floor and reached above the walls of the booth. With the help of the students from Kendall College of Art and Design, the painted wood structure, secured with wire cables, measured 25 x 15 x 15 feet in total.

Alois Kronschlaeger 30 Degrees

Alois Kronschlaeger 30 Degrees

Alois Kronschlaeger 30 Degrees

Alois Kronschlaeger 30 Degrees

30º at UNTITLED

Scale Model of 30º

Paul Amenta and Tom Clinton of SiTE:LAB invited me to be their featured artist for the Untitled Art Fair in Miami 2013. Untitled is located in a tent directly on the beach, so my idea – much like Spire – was to cut a hole in the floor and have my site-specific installation emerge from the sand below. The images of the scale model showcase the monochromatic color scheme that I envisioned for 30º. The title of the work comes from the angle of piece, which aligns perfectly with the angle of the tent.

Alois Kronschlaeger 30 Degrees

Alois Kronschlaeger 30 Degrees

Alois Kronschlaeger 30 Degrees

Scale Model of 30º