3D rendering for the Bruce Museum

As you may know, an important component of the creation of my site-specific work and of my studio practice is to build a scale model. A scale model helps to steer my artistic approach and informs the installation onsite. I have not yet done a site-specific installation without a scale model, until now. (See examples of my scale models here: 30º, Multicolored Grid, Basin and Range, Spire, Allotropism.)

For the Bruce Museum’s Tales of Two Cities: New York & Beijing, I have used a new approach in the studio – 3-dimensional rendering. With the help of my intern, Sandra Lee, she and I were able to create visuals based on the existing architecture of the museum and insert the various gridded structures in the atrium. The result provides a view similar to that of my scale models and offers the benefit of some agility for this new type of site-specific piece.

Bruce Museum 3D Rendering Alois Kronschlaeger

Bruce Museum 3D Rendering Alois Kronschlaeger

Bruce Museum 3D Rendering Alois Kronschlaeger

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3D rendering for the Bruce Museum

Testing the first cube at the Bruce Museum

As with any of my works or installations, I generally run a series of tests before making any decisions and it was extremely crucial for me to test this installation for a number of reasons.

For one, I am working on a new scale, with new pieces to the puzzle and I need to make sure that the small cubes will make a big impact when stacked together.

The second reason is that I need to see how the cubes will interact with the mirrored plexiglass we have placed at the bottom of the piece. How will the effect be? How will the various cubes react?

And the third reason – and ultimately the most important to me in any site-specific installation – is the lighting. How do the cubes interact with the light coming in from the window? With the light coming from the lightbulbs? In contrast to the black wall? In reaction to the plexiglass?

Finally, how does it all interact with the existing architecture? I consider all these various components when I create and install a site-specific work so this step is very important and has a direct impact upon the direction of the piece.

Alois Kronschlaeger Bruce Museum

Alois Kronschlaeger Bruce Museum Cube

Testing the first cube at the Bruce Museum

Installation begins at the Bruce Museum

With countless hours of preparation in my studio with the help of Sandra Lee, Christian Anwander, and Florencia Minniti, we were ready to bring the pre-assembled cubes to the Bruce Museum. Anne von Stuelpnagel prepared the atrium for my arrival by painting the walls black and collaborated with me on the lighting design while Jack Coyle oversaw the unloading of the truck filled with cubes.

Jack Coyle Anne von Stuelpnagel

Alois Kronschlaeger Bruce Museum

Installation begins at the Bruce Museum

Christian Anwander in the studio

In addition to the enormous help from Sandra Lee, I had the opportunity to put my good friend and fashion photographer, Christian Anwander, to work in the studio. With his hard work, we were able to prepare the cubes for the upcoming site-specific installation for the Bruce Museum’s Tales of Two Cities: New York & Beijing.

Christian Anwander staining

Christian Anwander in the studio

My tireless intern, Sandra Lee

With thousands of sticks to stain in preparation for my site-specific installation at the Bruce Museum, I needed some additional help in my studio. With thanks to my friend Nicolas Touron, I was introduced to Sandra Lee. Sandra is an SVA student who is majoring in Graphic Design. She has also studied architecture at École Nationale Supérieur d’Architecture de Paris-Belleville. She has spent many long days assisting me in the studio, staining countless sticks of bass wood. Many thanks for all of your help, Sandra!

Sandra Lee intern staining

My tireless intern, Sandra Lee

Site-specific installation for the Bruce Museum

As I mentioned in my previous post, my site-specific installation for the Bruce Museum’s Tales of Two Cities: New York & Beijing will be slightly different from the monumental work I have created before. Instead of constructing one solid sculpture that spans an entire space and crosses planes, I will be producing a series of small-scale cubes of various colors to create a new gridded structure. The piece will be assembled within the museum’s unique rotunda space.

The process thus far has been extremely time-consuming in the studio – measuring, cutting, staining, stacking, and gluing the pieces of bass wood – but I believe the outcome will be stunning.

waffle making  

waffles

Site-specific installation for the Bruce Museum

Upcoming Exhibition – Tales of Two Cities: New York & Beijing at the Bruce Museum

Alois Kronschlaeger Study for Bruce Museum

I am delighted to be a part of the upcoming exhibition Tales of Two Cities: New York & Beijing opening at the Bruce Museum on May 3rd. For this show, I will be creating a site-specific installation of a different sort. Here is a description of the exhibition:

This exhibition focuses on two of the world’s leading centers of art — New York and Beijing — and offers a visual pairing of five New York-based artists with five Beijing-based artists. The ten artists have been engaged in five different global, cross-cultural, artistic dialogues over the course of two years via email, Skype, in person, sometimes with translators, about issues ranging from political and social upheaval, the concept of global culture, and questions about materials and techniques. Some of the artists are creating new works for the exhibition including two site-specific works being created at the Museum, others are represented by existing or historic works.

The concept for this show grew out of an earlier collaboration curated by Pan Qing at Columbia University’s Studio X in Beijing in 2010 between New York-based artist Michelle Fornabai and Beijing-based artist Qin Feng, both of whom are featured in the present show.

“Watching Michelle Fornabai and Qin Feng communicate silently through the brush helped to open my mind to the myriad possibilities of visual dialogues between artists from very different artistic backgrounds,” Qing explains. “After discussing this idea with the other curators and advisors of this exhibition — Michelle Y. Loh, John Rajchman and Sarah McNaughton — a decision was made to expand on this theme by seeking out more opportunities to pair artists from disparate cultures.”

The curators matched the pairs based partly on the kind of work that they do and their artistic processes, but more importantly on the type of dialogue in which they suspected the artists might engage within the context of their respective urban environments. Many of the ten artists are themselves peripatetic, on the move between global art centers, not only New York and Beijing, but also in Latin America and Europe.

Paired artists include:

  • Michelle Fornabai(NYC) and Qin Feng (Beijing)
  • Joan Snyder (NYC) and Wei Jia (Beijing)
  • Alois Kronschlaeger (NYC) and Lin Yan (Beijing)
  • Jorge Tacla (NYC) and Li Taihuan (Beijing)
  • Simon Lee (NYC) and Chen Shaoxiong (Beijing)

Selected artworks illustrate parallels between the pairs’ work and themes that arose during their conversations. Some of the artists are represented by existing or historic artworks, some have created new pieces, and some have collaborated to create site-specific work. The works range from Joan Snyder’s My Pain Is No More Than Being’s Pain, which dates from 1983 and is in the Bruce Museum’s collection, to pieces created specifically for this exhibition.

The exhibition is generously supported by The Charles M. and Deborah G. Royce Exhibition Fund and a Committee of Honor.

Upcoming Exhibition – Tales of Two Cities: New York & Beijing at the Bruce Museum